News

U.S. Lighthouse Society 2019 Calendar – This Calendar Supports Lighthouses!

#3 Calendar 2015
Front Cover: Barnegat, NJ – Edward Hewitt

Lighthouses are not only important historical structures representing our maritime heritage, they are also architectural wonders. Located in stunning picturesque locations, they are inspirational in nature and are often lovingly memorialized by all kinds of artists including writers, photographers, and film makers.

Simply “being” at a lighthouse and enjoying its surrounding property is a deeply meaningful experience to most, and something that creates a lasting memory. This year we challenged our members to present their best photos in seven different categories.

Click here to order your 2019 calendar today!

Here are the photos that were selected for the 2019 calendar:

01 Weather - South_Haven MI_by_Michael_McKinney
Weather: South Haven, MI – Michael McKinney
02 Tech - Jupiter_Lighthouse_FL_2014_by_Christine_Pabst
Technology: Jupiter, FL – Christine Pabst
03 Pres Project - Sandy Point Shoal_Dave Jurgensen
Preservation Project: Sandy Point Shoal, MD – David Jurgensen
04 Reflection - Spurn_Lightship_Hull_England_2017_by_Yvette_Dills
Reflection: Spurn Lightship, Hull, England – Yvette Dills
05 Landscape - Castillo_San_Filipe_Del_Morro_Lighthouse_in_Puerto_Rico_2...
Landscape: Castillo San Filipe Del Morro, Puerto Rico – Michael Smith
06 Landscape - Mobile_Bay_AL_2014_by_Rich_Buckner
Landscape: Mobile Bay, Alabama – Rich Buckner
07 Abstract - Anclote Key _Carlene Bruha .
Abstract: Anclote Key, FL – John Bruha
08 Sunrise - Hillsboro_Inlet_2013-01-06._Ralph Krugler
Sunrise – Hillsboro Inlet, FL – Ralph Krugler
09 Abstract - FoweyRocksFL2015byEric_S._Martin
Abstract – Fowey Rocks, FL – Eric Martin

10 Reflection - Boston_Harbor_MA_2012_by_Rick_Schneider
Reflection – Boston Harbor, MA – Rick Schneider
11 Grand Haven Lights, MI by Bill Bates
Weather – Grand Haven Lights, MI – Bill Bates
12 Weather - Port Austin Reef_Hallie Wilson
Port Austin Reef, MI – Hallie Wilson
000 Back Cover -Reflection - New_Canal_LA_2018_by_David_Zapatka
Back Cover: New Canal, LA – David Zapatka

 2019 Honorable Mention

Russ Katje, Betty Veronico, Jeannette O’Neal, Dave Waller, Michael Douglas, Michael Unruh

A big thank you to all of you who submitted your wonderful photos! 

News

Tawas Point Lighthouse Keeper Program is accepting applicants for 2019

Tawas Point State Park is located on the shores of Lake Huron, 2.5 miles southeast of East Tawas in Iosco County, Michigan. The most iconic feature of the park is the Victorian‐era Tawas Point Lighthouse.

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Tawas Point Lighthouse (USLHS archives)

The Tawas Point Lighthouse Keeper Program provides participants the privilege of living at one of Michigan’s most notable lighthouses, and assisting in its preservation and presentation to the public.

Interested? Click here to find out more and to apply for the program.

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.

News

The State of New Jersey proposes placing a “Geotube” to save East Point Lighthouse

East Point Lighthouse in 2008 (USLHS archives)

New Jersey’s historic East Point Lighthouse on Delaware Bay is severely threatened by erosion. A recent storm breeched the dune system that protected it, making the situation even more dire. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has come up with a creative solution: the placement of a 900-foot-long “Geotube,” made of synthetic material and filled with sand. Due to environmental concerns, the project can’t happen until next summer.

Click here to read more about this story in the Press of Atlantic City

 

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.

News

Australia’s first light station celebrates its 200th anniversary

On November 30, 1818 — 200 years ago yesterday — the whale oil lamp in the original Macquarie Lighthouse, south of the entrance to the harbor of Sydney, Australia, was lighted for the first time. The original tower was completed in 1818 by convict Francis Greenway, who earned a pardon for his work.

MaquarieLighthouseGreenway
The first Macquarie Lighthouse, built 1816-18. Photograph taken in the 1870s; from the Papers of James Barnet, State Library of New South Wales.

The original lighthouse, made of soft sandstone, deteriorated quickly, and the 85-foot tower that stands today was built in 1883. It was automated in 1976 and is managed and controlled by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority out of Canberra.

You can read more on the ABC Radio Sydney site

And you can read more on the Macquarie University site

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.

News

Meet Nancy McDowell, modern day “keeper” of Point Pinos Lighthouse (CA)

The Spanish explorer Sebastián Vizcaíno named Point Pinos (“Point of Pines”) in 1602 because of the pine trees that blanketed the area. Today, the oldest standing lighthouse in California is surrounded by the Pacific Grove Golf Course, but it remains a spectacular location.

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Point Pinos Lighthouse in April 2015. Photo by Jeremy D’Entremont.

Point Pinos is renowned for two women keepers: Charlotte Layton, who replaced her husband Charles — the first keeper — after he was fatally shot while on a posse in pursuit of an outlaw, and Emily Maitland Fish, who earned the nickname “Socialite Keeper” because of her regard for fashion and style as well as her habit of entertaining artists, writers, and other guests at the lighthouse. Fish populated the 92-acre station with French poodles, Holstein cows, thoroughbred horses, and chickens during her more than two decades (1893-1914) at Point Pinos.

Ownership of the property was transferred to the City of Pacific Grove in 2006, while the automated light remains active. The docent coordinator is Nancy McDowell, who retired in 2001 from a career as a special education teacher. She’s featured in an article in the November 29 Monterey County Weekly. Nancy says her biggest fear is that the lighthouse is becoming too popular; there were about 30,000 visitors last year.

“I always wanted to live in a lighthouse, my mother told me,” McDowell says. “I just have always loved lighthouses.”

You can read the article by following this link.

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.

News

Lighthouse heroine Abbie Burgess honored in “crankie” at the Farnsworth Museum in Rockland, Maine

Lighthouse buffs far and wide are familiar with the inspiring story of Abbie Burgess, daughter of a light keeper at Maine’s remote Matinicus Rock. At the age of 16 in 1856, Abbie kept the island’s two lights burning through a ferocious storm while simultaneously caring for her invalid mother and younger siblings, during a period when her father was away. Abbie later married a keeper, Isaac Grant, and was appointed assistant keeper herself — first at Matinicus Rock and then Whitehead Island.

AbbieBurgess
Abbie Burgess

This past Thanksgiving weekend, the Farnsworth Museum of Rockland, Maine, introduced an art project honoring Abbie Burgess on its Main Street windows. The project takes the form of a 25-foot long moving panorama, or “crankie.”

What is a crankie? It’s an old-fashioned form of storytelling that utilizes a long, moving, illustrated scroll wound onto two spools. The 25-foot-long Abbie Burgess scroll is the work of artist Annie Bailey in collaboration with Andrew White. Bailey, daughter of a ship captain, is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design. Her work has been featured in National Geographic, the Society of Illustrators, and other galleries and museums. To see examples of her work, visit anniebaileyart.com.

“Abbie Burgess, Lighthouse Heroine” will be on view in the Farnsworth’s Main Street windows through Jan. 15, operating from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. each day.

To read more, check these links:

https://knox.villagesoup.com/p/winter-windows-fetes-lighthouse-heroine/1791092

https://freepressonline.com/Content/Home/Homepage-Rotator/Article/Special-Winter-Windows-Installation-at-the-Farnsworth-/78/720/62110

 

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.

News

Famed Bowditch Ledge daybeacon in Salem, Mass., is no more

They don’t have the allure of lighthouses, but the many unlighted markers known as daybeacons along our coasts have played a vital role in navigation. One of the best known in New England is the granite daybeacon at Bowditch Ledge on the approach to the harbor of Salem, Massachusetts.

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Bowditch Ledge Daybeacon in June 2017/ Photo by Jeremy D’Entremont.

Its origins are shrouded in mystery, but it appears that Bowditch Ledge was named for named for sea captain William Bowditch, whose ship, the Essex Galley, ran up on the ledge in 1700. Ironically, William’s great grandson, Nathaniel Bowditch, is famed as the the author of The New American Practical Navigator (1802). The book remains a valuable handbook of navigation, oceanography, and meteorology.

The Bowditch Ledge Daybeacon, built of granite blocks, was in visibly precarious condition in recent years. Repeated battering from this November’s storms was the final straw, and the structure toppled recently.

You can read more in the Salem News.

 

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.