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Guest Column: Guiding Lights: A Story Of America’s Lighthouses By Christian Taber, Age 12

Hilton Head Range Rear SC 2008 Aug. 31st Mike & Carol McKinney copy (1)
Hilton Head Range Rear (Leamington) Lighthouse, SC. Photo Courtesy of Mike & Carol McKinney.

When you hear the word “lighthouse,” you probably think “island,” “beach,” or “vacation.” Lighthouses are more than just tourist attractions or part of your dream vacation. They are structures of America’s past and they tell a story.

Lighthouses were the guiding lights for sailors, warning them of danger and helping them have a safe trip. The light fought through the darkness of a stormy night. Keepers worked 24/7 keeping the lamps burning. Because of new technology, some lighthouses have gone dark. Some lighthouses have been sold; some have become museums, shops, or even parking lots (that’s not good!), and some are subject to neglect and have been left to be eaten away by time (that’s not good, either!).

The United States Lighthouse Society (USLHS) was founded 1984. They are determined to preserve these pieces of American history. I was at the Harbour Town Lighthouse in Hilton Head, South Carolina, where I purchased a USLHS Lighthouse Passport. I have been to this lighthouse many times, but what actually sparked my greater interest in lighthouses is the Leamington Lighthouse in Hilton Head. After exploring this old lighthouse, out of curiosity, I went to the USLHS website and learned about their mission of preserving lighthouses. For my 12th birthday, my parents got me a Keeper level membership. I would like to thank USLHS for rushing my membership card (it arrived on my birthday!) and for including a few other things for my birthday. I am very excited to be a part of the USLHS community.

Christian Taber, USLHS Member

4 thoughts on “Guest Column: Guiding Lights: A Story Of America’s Lighthouses By Christian Taber, Age 12

  1. This young man has a career waiting for him. His very mature use of the English language is wonderful and I hope he will consider writing (especially on the subject of lighthouses, of course) as a career. This young man is to be commended for his grasp of the language.

    A “young at heart” lighthouser,
    Sandra D.J.
    12/05/1943

    Like

  2. Congratulations on discovering the wonderful USLHS and the passport program. I enjoyed reading your story and am glad a young person is interested in preserving our maritime history.

    Like

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