News

New York City’s “Little Red Lighthouse” will be open for tours on October 13

Jeffrey’s Hook Lighthouse, located on the Hudson River in the shadow of the George Washington Bridge, in New York City’s Fort Washington Park, is best known as the inspiration for Hildegarde Swift’s 1942 children’s book The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge. In the book, after its light is turned off, the lighthouse feels insignificant but soon learns that small can be mighty.

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2008 photo by Jeremy D’Entremont

On Saturday, October 13, there will be public tours of the lighthouse, led by the Urban Park Rangers. The tours will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and will be first come, first served.

Click here for more information.

News

Rare Open House at Hospital Point Lighthouse (Beverly, MA), on Sept. 30

Hospital Point Lighthouse, in Beverly on Boston’s North Shore, has several distinctions. Its lantern still holds its original 3 1/2-order Fresnel lens, along with a rare condensing panel that helps define the shipping channel into Salem Harbor. In 1927, the lighthouse became the front light in range when a light was added to the steeple of Beverly’s First Baptist Church, making the light in the steeple the rear range light. And since 1947, the light station has served as home to the commander of the First Coast Guard District.

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Late 19th century view of Hospital Point Light Station, National Archives photo 26-LG-7-24A.

The attractive square brick tower is rarely opened to the public, but there will be an open house on Sunday, September 30. On that day, from 12 noon to 3 p.m., visitors will be guided by members of the Coast Guard Auxiliary up the winding stairs and a seven-step ladder to the lantern room. From there they will pass through the hatch onto the lantern gallery to enjoy the spectacular view.

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Hospital Point Light Station in August 2018. Photo by Jeremy D’Entremont.

For more information and directions, click here.

News

Replica barn to be built at Marshall Point Lighthouse, Maine

Port Clyde, Maine: The Marshall Point Lighthouse and Museum Board of Directors broke ground for the replica of the Keeper’s Barn and Workshop on Wednesday, Sept. 12, following a year-long fundraising campaign. Site preparations begin this month.

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Circa 1859 view of Marshall Point Light Station. National Archives image 26-LG-3-51.

You can read more here.

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.

News

Low Point Lighthouse, NS, renovated

A lighthouse has marked Low Point, in northeastern Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, since 1826. The current concrete tower, built in 1936, still holds the iron lantern from the original tower. Many people pass the lighthouse on ferries from Newfoundland, on their way to Sydney, NS.

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Photo by Dennis Jarvis (Wikimedia Commons)

Thanks to the Low Point Lighthouse Society, the tower has received a needed overhaul. Low Point Lighthouse was a $75,000 grand prize winner in the 2015 “This Lighthouse Matters” crowd funding competition organized by the National Trust for Canada and the Nova Scotia Lighthouse Preservation Society.

“We wanted to get it beautiful to attract some attention to it, to get some people down there,” Lawrence MacSween, co-chair of the Low Point Lighthouse Society along with Rob Murphy, told the Cape Breton Post.

Click here to read more.

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.

News

“Lighthouses of America” by Tom Beard gets a glowing review from the Military Writers Society of America

Lighthouses of America is a splendid and diverse pictorial collection of the American ‘castles’ guarding our coasts.  In addition to nearly 150 breathtaking photographs, Tom Beard (Editor-in-Chief) and Tom Thompson (Graphics Editor), in conjunction with the United States Lighthouse Society, accomplished a masterful job compiling a treasure trove of historical and often humorous tidbits.  The book educates and delights the reader and leaves him/her hungry to discover more.”

You can read the rest of the review by clicking here.

Lighthouses of America, published in association with the U.S. Lighthouse Society, is a beautiful 176 page, hardcover book featuring stunning photographs of lighthouses across the country taken by Society photographers.

Click here for more information and to buy the book.

News

Obituary for J. Candace Clifford

An obituary for our dear friend J. Candace Clifford appeared in the September 14 edition of the Washington Post, and it can be viewed online by clicking here. All are invited to post their thoughts in the guest book.

As mentioned in the obituary, there will be a celebration of her life through tributes, a potluck reception, and dancing at Glen Echo Park (MD), Bumper Car Pavilion on Sunday, October 21, beginning at 11 a.m. Click here for directions to Glen Echo Park.

 

News

Plymouth “Gurnet” Lighthouse (MA) celebrating its 250th birthday in style

The present lighthouse at the end of the Gurnet Peninsula at the entrance to the harbor of Plymouth, Massachusetts, built in 1843, is the oldest free-standing wooden lighthouse in the United States. The original lighthouse on the site consisted of a keeper’s dwelling built in 1768 with two lights on its roof. It was the continent’s first “twin lights,” and in 1776 Hannah Thomas became the first female light keeper in the American colonies when her husband, keeper John Thomas, left to lead troops in the Revolutionary War.

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Plymouth Light Station retained two lights until 1924, when the northeast lighthouse tower was discontinued and torn down. This postcard view is from the early 1900s.

The light station celebrates its 250th anniversary later this month. Project Gurnet and Bug Lights Inc. is a nonprofit organization that was founded in 1983 to preserve the lighthouse along with nearby Duxbury Pier (“Bug”) Lighthouse. The group will host the birthday party for the lighthouse from 6 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 22, at the Plymouth Yacht Club. Tickets are $50 per person and include hearty hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction and more. There will be a cash bar. Nautical attire is encouraged.

Visit www.buglight.org to learn more and to buy tickets.

*   *   *   *   *   *

U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. You can receive these posts via email if you click on the “SUBSCRIBE” button in the right-hand column. Please support this electronic newsletter by joining the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member.

If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to Jeremy at nelights@gmail.com.