Education · News

National Archives Creates Lighthouse Coloring Book

Lighthouse Coloring Book Cover
The National Archives has put together a coloring book based on architectural drawings of lighthouses found in Record Group 26. What a great way to engage kids (of any age) with lighthouses!

The downloadable PDF is available here or by going to their website at https://www.archives.gov/campaigns/lighthouse-coloring-book.  The Archives is encouraging folks to share their creations on Twitter by using the hashtag #ColorOurCollections and tagging @usnatarchives. Alternatively, send your creations to me at candace@uslhs.org and I may share them too!

You can explore more architectural and maritime images in the Archives’ online Catalog.

Submitted by Candace Clifford, February 19, 2018

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. Please join the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member. If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to candace@uslhs.org.

News · photography · Society Members

Call for Submissions – REFLECTION / UNUSUAL PERSPECTIVE category

Society photographers are encouraged to get out and create an image for the Reflection / Unusual Perspective category for the Lighthouse Society’s Calendar contest. Take this opportunity to look for a reflection or view the lighthouse at a different angle. Or maybe you have a favorite image in your archives? The submission deadline is March 30, 2018.

Goto https://uslhs.submittable.com/submit to submit your image.

Here are some images from last year’s contest.

There’s still time to submit your Weather image.  The deadline for the Weather category is February 28, 2018. (There is a separate submission form for each category.)

Looking forward to seeing your best shot!

Submitted by Candace Clifford, February 15, 2018

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. Please join the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member. If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to candace@uslhs.org.

Education · Kate's Corner · News

KATE’S CORNER #18

Kate Walker here, keeping the light on  Robbins Reef.. I know that at least two people are reading my blog because they caught the typo in the last post.

Spectacle Reef sectional elevation
Sectional elevation for the construction of Spectacle Reef. Courtesy National Archives

Two more architectural types that I haven’t discussed were used offshore. My lighthouse on Robbins Reef is on a crib. According to Lighthouse Friends, “A wooden cofferdam was pieced together on the reef, made watertight, and pumped dry. Workmen then entered the cofferdam and built up a foundation that was subsequently capped with a granite, circular crib. Atop this crib, a four-story, iron sparkplug tower was erected.” Wooden cribs, constructed onshore, towed to the site, and then filled with stone to sink them in place were a lighthouse foundation type used in places where a hard rock bottom would not allow for a caisson or screwpile.

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The 93-foot Spectacle Reef Lighthouse (1874) on Lake Huron, Michigan, is located 10½ miles from the closest land. Courtesy National Archives

Construction of Toledo Harbor Lighthouse began in 1901. Since there was no outcropping of rock to use as a foundation, the Army Corps of Engineers came up with a creative way to build the light in the middle of the lake. They sunk a large crib below the water and filled it with stone. Once the crib was in place, they topped it with a concrete base, completing the artificial island. The engineers next put steel frames in place, providing stability for a three-story brick structure. Attached to it was a one-story fog signal building. Both structures are still standing today. A light tower projects from the roof of the dwelling.

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The Brandywine Shoal caisson lighthouse replaced the pile structure in 1914. Courtesy U.S. Coast Guard Historian’s Office
Baltimore Elevation
This drawing shows the caisson foundation for Baltimore Lighthouse, Maryland. Courtesy of Historic Lighthouse Preservation Handbook

Caisson foundations worked well in unconsolidated bottoms composed of sand or mud. The caisson lighthouse used a large cast-iron cylinder, which was sunk on the bottom and filled with rock and concrete to form a foundation. The caisson foundation was sturdier and better able to withstand heavy stress than the pile foundation lighthouses, so it is not surprising that caisson lighthouses were built in areas where moving ice was a hazard. Brandywine Shoal in New Jersey replaced a pile lighthouse in 1914. Where bottoms were harder, contained rocks, and/or needed greater depth of penetration into the substrate, a pneumatic process was used. The substrate within the caisson was removed and the caisson allowed to sink further into the bottom. Eleven pneumatic caisson lighthouses were built in the United States. The Sabine Bank Lighthouse (1905) in Texas is the most exposed, located 15 miles offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, the only caisson south of the Chesapeake Bay.

A relatively recent technological development in lighthouse construction was the Texas tower type which replaced exposed lightships offshore. Texas towers were modeled on the offshore oil drilling platforms first employed off the Texas coast. The first Texas tower lighthouse in the United States was the Buzzards Bay Light, located in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, and commissioned on November 1, 1961. A total of six Texas tower lighthouses were constructed.

I’m very curious about caissons and Texas towers because I’ve never seen any of them. I’m delighted, however, to offer you photos and drawings of cribs and caissons.

Sources: Lighthouse Friends and Historic Lighthouse Preservation Handbook, Part 4

Submitted February 7, 2018

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. Please join the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member. If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to candace@uslhs.org.

 

Conferences · News

MHC Preliminary Schedule Released

MHC

The preliminary schedule for the February 14 – 17, 2018, Maritime Heritage Conference in New Orleans has been released. Society Board Member Mike Vogel has prepared a track specifically on lighthouses with a wide variety of topics. Speakers include Debra Baldwin (Lighthouse Digest), Candace Clifford (U.S. Lighthouse Society), Jessie Cragg (University of West Florida), Celestina Cuadrado (National Lighthouse Museum), Linda Dianto (National Lighthouse Museum), Ralph Eshelman (U.S. Lighthouse Society), Henry Gonzalez (U.S. Lighthouse Society), Jon Hill (Pensacola Lighthouse & Museum), Bryan Lijewski (Michigan State Historic Preservation Office), Scott Howell (Robinson Iron), Joseph J. Jakubik (International Chimney Corp.), Amy Lent (Maine Maritime Museum), Josh Liller (Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse), Ted Panayotoff (Lighthouse and Naval historian), Ellen Rankin (National Park Service), Michelle Smay (Smay Trombley Architecture), Ken Smith (KS Architects), Mike Vogel (Buffalo Lighthouse Association), Wayne Wheeler (U.S. Lighthouse Society), and David Zapatka (Plum Beach Lighthouse Association).

In addition to lighthouses, conference topics will include, but are not limited to, Maritime and Naval History; Coast Guard History, Maritime Art, Literature, and Music; Education and Preservation; Underwater Archaeology; Trade and Communications; Maritime Libraries, Archives, and Museums; Marine Science and Ocean Conservation; Historic Vessel Restoration; Maritime Heritage Grant Program; Maritime Landscapes; National Marine Sanctuaries; Inland Waters; Commerce and Seaport Operations; Small Craft; Shipbuilding; Marine Protected Areas; Crew and Staff Training and Development; Tall Ships, Sail Training, and Education Under Sail; Vessel Operations and Safety; Tall Ships® Events and Host Ports; Not-for-Profit Administration; Fund Development; Media and Publications; and Marketing and Social Media.

Click here for registration information.

Click here for hotel information.

Submitted by Candace Clifford, February 3, 2018

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. Please join the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member. If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to candace@uslhs.org.

Lighthouses in Art · News · Society Members

Lighthouses as Inspiration

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Lightship 95, London, England, by Elaine Marie Austin

My love of lighthouses has not only transformed the way I travel, but the way I live. When I am not traveling to a lighthouse, I am often writing about or painting lighthouses. I’ve painted lighthouses in Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Massachusetts, New Orleans, New York, London and Ireland. I am intrigued by the many varieties and designs of lighthouses. My favorite memories are of Lightship 95 in London. It is converted into music studio. Another favorite is the abandoned Milneburg Lighthouse on the campus of New Orleans University. In these paintings, I capture their eternal essence—undaunted by time and circumstance.

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Milneburg or Port Pontchartrain Lighthouse, New Orleans, Louisiana, by Elaine Marie Austin

I am drawn to lighthouses because of their noble past and precarious future. For centuries lighthouses have faithfully served as guardians of the sea. Now the past and the present are merging as lighthouses once again become drivers of the economy. Lighthouses are popular tourist destinations. Business owners complained when Port Isabel Lighthouse in Texas was temporarily closed. Lighthouses are worthy of preservation for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations. Because of my firm belief in the importance of lighthouses, I have created a family lighthouse workshop. I hope my lighthouse workshop and paintings will inspire others to visit, love and appreciate lighthouses as much as I do.

Submitted by Society Member Elaine Marie Austin, February 1, 2018. You can see more of her lighthouse-inspired creations at elainemarieartist.com or read her blog at elainemarieartist.wordpress.com.

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. Please join the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member. If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to candace@uslhs.org.

News · Tours

2018 Lighthouse Society Tours

The 2018 U.S. Lighthouse Society tour schedule has been announced.

Enjoy a wonderful experience visiting, photographing and, whenever possible, climbing to the top of a lighthouse. Counting the steps to the top, you can imagine the complex life and responsibilities of lighthouse keepers. With each light station visit, you’ll develop an appreciation for each lighthouse’s history and discover what makes them special.

Lighthouses were often built in remote locations (on both land and at sea), making some challenging to access, or are closed to the general public. Also, lighthouses are sometimes open seasonally for limited hours. But you’re in luck! Our tours are designed to overcome these obstacles. We’ll arrange the access and transportation needed to reach our destinations. A tour with the U.S. Lighthouse Society is sure to provide incredible memories for all lighthouse enthusiasts.

Please direct any questions to (415) 362-7255 or info@uslhs.org. A registration form is available to download and mail to ensure your place.

Submitted January 30, 2018

Job Announcements · News

Heceta Lighthouse B&B Seeks Assistant Manager

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Heceta Head Keeper’s Dwelling. Image courtesy of Heceta Lighthouse Bed & Breakfast

Heceta Lighthouse Bed and Breakfast is located halfway between Florence and Yachats on the Central Oregon Coast.  We are a high end, six-room inn occupying the historic light keepers’ home at Heceta Head Lighthouse. This well-reputed unique inn is known across the globe for its dramatic scenery, rich maritime history, and amazing 7 Course Breakfast.  Not only do we offer lodging, we also serve as an Interpretive Center, gift shop, and a busy event venue. Guests are welcomed as friends and staff is treated like family in a positive and respectful atmosphere. Listed on the National Register of Historic places and owned by the US Forest Service, it is our mission to be good stewards of this property through restoring and publicly sharing this national gem.

Heceta Lighthouse B&B is seeking an Assistant Manager to join our experienced team in a year-round full-time position.  This is a hands-on position that entails working the day-to-day operations and assisting in managerial duties. This dynamic candidate must be available weekdays, weekends, and holidays. Typical work hours are between 8am and 6pm. Compensation is competitive and based on experience, with benefits including medical insurance and paid vacation.

For more information – https://www.hecetalighthouse.com/latest-news/hiring-assistant-manager

Submitted by Misty Anderson, Inn Manager and Event Coordinator, Heceta Lighthouse Bed and Breakfast, January 29, 2018

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U.S. Lighthouse Society News is produced by the U.S. Lighthouse Society to support lighthouse preservation, history, education and research. Please join the U.S. Lighthouse Society if you are not already a member. If you have items of interest to the lighthouse community and its supporters, please email them to candace@uslhs.org.